Motivation

All posts in the Motivation category

FIRST BLACK OWNED PHARMACY OPENS IN BACONTON, GA

Published March 4, 2016 by sheezacoldpiece

  
Totalcare Pharmacy

Phone Number 229-787-5765

149 E Walton St, Baconton, GA 31716-7705

At the corner on East Walton Street in Baconton sits a small brick building. But it’s not just any building, it’s the first black owned pharmacy and a ribbon cutting was held Monday morning to celebrate its opening.

Dr. Teresa Mitchell, owner of Total Care Pharmacy, says this is an exciting opportunity for her. “I’m very excited to be a leader and entrepreneur in the area,” said Mitchell.

No stranger to Baconton, Dr. Mitchell has been a practicing pharmacist for over 20 years and she’s also from Mitchell County. Recently she taught the pharmacy technician program at Albany Technical College. Being an entrepreneur is something Mitchell has dreamed about for a while.

“We started back in September 2014, and for me I would say that it was a God move,” Mitchell said. “As far as the area, it was a seed that my father planted before he passed. He told me that if I ever wanted to start a business, to start it in Baconton because it was the hub, it was the center, it was going to grow.”

If you’re in the area and need you meds, go support this historic pharmacy.  For all, by us.  Congrats Dr. Mitchell!

Advertisements

GET READY FOR THE VERY FIRST “AMERICAN BLACK FILM FESTIVAL AWARDS” CEREMONY

Published February 19, 2016 by sheezacoldpiece

  
Kerry Washington, Taye Diggs and Octavia Spencer are expected at the first American Black Film Festival Awards — organized in response to the Oscars’ snub of black performers.
The ABFF Awards in LA on Sunday will honor Diahann Carroll, Don Cheadle, Regina King, “Creed” director Ryan Coogler and Will Packer.
Carl Weathers, who played Apollo Creed in the “Rocky” films, will present the film category. The awards show will air on BET and Centric on Tuesday.

This is what we need to recognize and honor “us” when others don’t.  We don’t need a Oscar to validate our talent and hardwork.  We need exactly this platform by us, for us, to showcase our talents and achievements.  

Be sure to tune in  Tuesday, Feb. 23 at 8 p.m. ET/PT on BET and Centric as the American Black Film Festival, BET, and Black Enterprise host ABFF Awards, an annual gala saluting excellence in motion pictures and television.

KENDRICK LAMAR WINS BIG AT THE 2016 GRAMMY’s….

Published February 15, 2016 by sheezacoldpiece

  
Kendrick Lamar picked up 4 Grammy awards out of 11 nominations tonight.  Absolutely deserving of each award.  The recognition for his album “To Pimp A Butterfly” (which I purchased) is a clear sign of the awakening happening across Amerikkka.  

  
The White House even acknowledged his achievements tonight.  Most important and empowering was his phenomenal performance.  If you couldn’t decipher his lyrics, it’s okay- it’s melanin morse code. He gave us visuals symbolic of the epidemic of mass incarceration black people face in Amerikkka.  He then switched to tribal Afrikan artistry and dancers from the motherland.  While they censored his lyrics “and we hate PoPo” and looked shocked and disturbed in the audience,  he ended it with a bang…a huge projection of the Mother Africa with Compton centered in the middle.

  
That silhouette was the catalyst of his performance tonight.  The performances I’ve seen over the last week, first Beyoncé with her pro black homage to the Black Panther Party – now Kendrick Lamar’s epic performance of the black plight and strife in America has made me proud.

  
  
It’s long overdue for our artist to stand up and stand for something greater and more important than their fame.  Our voices need to be heard, and their platform is the perfect setting to get the message across.  Yes, we will be Alright…as Kendrick shouts.  We will be heard, and most importantly, we will overcome the injustice in this country.

Congrats to Kendrick on his awards tonight 

  
 
  
  
 
  
If you missed his performance you can watch it here:

BEYONCÉ GIVES US A 8 MINUTE MINI-DOCUMENTARY DEDICATED TO BLACK MEN…

Published February 11, 2016 by sheezacoldpiece

Beyoncé has become publicly in tune with her blackness, and has been giving us the audio and visual display to prove it.  On the heel of the SUPERBOWL 50 controversy, she has put out a 8 minute mini documentary of her “Precious Lord” performance that was oddly somewhat stolen from Ledisi, as she was the singer in the Film “Selma”.  The jury is still out on the Ledisi shade 😒 but Beyoncé highjacked the song and sang it, and tells us the song has special meaning to her and her family as she recalls her mother singing the Mahalia Jackson version when she was a young girl.  

I’m a bit undecided as to why she chose the most softest spoken men for this documentary. Perhaps with the intent to give off the black men are non threatening and vulnerable vibe, which of course many are, but a good mix of that along with some deep strong voices, and bold masculinity wouldn’t have hurt either.  I’m just saying.  We are a wide range of people, all experiencing injustices and discrimination on various levels.  

Give it a watch as she sings the old negro spiritual with an all male choir, giving us the back story and meaning of this song and how it still resonates today.

NAS GOES FROM ILLMATIC TO BILLMATIC – BILLIONAIRE RAPPER

Published February 10, 2016 by sheezacoldpiece

  
Not only is the man FINE as the best wine, he’s brilliant too.  Who knew that “Nas” Nasir Jones was quietly on his way to earning billions with his Los Angeles based Venture Capital Firm.

Count Nasir Jones, the multiplatinum-selling rapper better known by his stage moniker “Nas,” among thee elite group. The Queens, New York-bred artist who first hit the charts more than 20 years ago has quietly metamorphosed into a prolific angel investor — founding the venture capital firm QueensBridge Venture Partners. The firm (not to be confused with the hip-hop supergroup Jones fronted back in the ’90s) funnels cash into start-ups as varied as health care, financial technology and Bitcoin.

QueensBridge, based in Los Angeles, invests in more than 40 start-ups across a range of sectors like financial technology, health care and music production. That has helped put Jones in the same strata as Ashton Kutcher and U2 frontman Bono as the tech world’s most influential celebrity investors.

So in a complex sector where billions are harvested — and cash hungry start-ups are born and buried in the blink of an eye — how does one of rap’s living legends define his investment philosophy? Jones’ answer is surprisingly simple.

“People. That is the absolute No. 1,” Jones told CNBC via email. “I love to bet on great people that inspire me and make me think or see things differently.”

A big part of that has to do with the management team, Jones added, which “makes a huge difference in the kinds of companies that will stick out to me.”

Some of the companies that have grabbed the artist’s attention include Silicon Valley darlings like Lyft, Dropbox, Coinbase and Tradesy, all of which are part of QueensBridge’s investment bailiwick.

The ride-sharing service and online storage provider are among technology’s biggest “unicorns” — private startups valued at least $1 billion — and are poised to become publicly-traded companies once the current downturn subsides. One of QueensBridge’s latest investments is LANDR, a start-up that uses big data and artificial intelligence to produce music. LANDR has raised more than $8 million from various sources in the last few years, including Jones’ firm.

Silicon Valley is a long way from the rough and tumble world of the New York City neighborhood that’s interwoven in the lore of Jones’ musical mythology. The 42-year-old artist, an autodidact who dropped out of school after the eighth grade, told CNBC his affinity for learning led him to technology investing.
I’ve always wanted to be surrounded by the smartest people in the world, and didn’t want to limit that to just music,” he wrote to CNBC.
“I want to meet the people who are innovating in all different fields, and investing lets me do that,” Jones said. “I meet the people that are changing the game across all different industries, and I get to be there first at the ground level. It’s helped me to progress tremendously in my business.”
Despite the recent downturn in the market, it’s been a lucrative time to be a technology investor. Last year was a record for venture capital, with more than $128 billion finding their way to a range of companies worldwide, according to data from KPMG Enterprise and CB Insights. Funds for small start-ups, otherwise known as angel investments, have boomed into a $24 billion market by itself, the Center for Venture Research says.



QueensBridge is pitched by more than 100 companies per month, and invests in only a small fraction of them. Anthony Saleh, Jones’ manager and partner at QueensBridge, told CNBC in a recent interview that the firm invests from $100,000 to $500,000 in a company, and has done more than 100 deals in the last six years.



Overall, QueensBridge invests in about 20 per year, Saleh said, adding that the firm is “much more top-down than bottom-up as investors. We concentrate on idea or the product, how big the market is and how the founding team is.”

The due diligence process, Saleh told CNBC, can be at least as qualitative as quantitative. Investing in a potential company can include intangibles like “experience, grit, life motivation … those are keys to what we look at. Then we look at how those things kind of mesh.”

Even in the freewheeling world of tech companies, corporate governance is a critical ingredient, he added.
“Nas’ biggest fear is investing in a company” where the leadership may be unethical, Saleh told CNBC. “He tends to ask more questions about that.”

  

QueensBridge, along with a clutch of other firms such as Warner Music Group, Real Ventures and YUL Ventures, recently invested in LANDR, where CEO Pascal Pilon fused his training in software engineering with business.

LANDR is Pilon’s second start-up, and the post music-production service helps master music for more than 300,000 musicians. Mastering is the final step in music production that happens after you record all of the parts and mix them together.


“We felt there was lots of room for musicians to embrace this thing,” Pilon told CNBC in a recent interview.



Given the expense and cumbersome effort involved in creating music masters, “Some musicians have never felt the instant gratification of completing a song, and don’t have the money to release more songs,” and LANDR helps them get there.



That argument cuts to the heart of the notion embraced by Jones and his team at QueensBridge: that a start-up investment is more than just about financial gain.



“I think anyone can be involved with investing if they have the means, but I’d advise anyone who wants to invest to be careful. You have to study it,” Jones said. “It’s not easy to find the projects that are going to generate a return, and you have to invest your time and energy — not just your money — into researching the companies that are going to do big things.”

Source – http://itsbx.com/redirect/?url=http://www.cnbc.com/2016/02/06/nas-is-likehalf-man-half-venture-capitalist.html

WHEN WHITE PEOPLE UNDERSTAND THE BLACK POWER MOVEMENT

Published February 8, 2016 by sheezacoldpiece

  
Meet Kate Forristall.  She “gets” it.  She wrote a message that gave me joy to read and know that there are white people out there who understand.  Sometimes when you read so much negativity from white people, like racial slurs and subtle jabs at Black Lives Matter,  you hardly see when we get their support.  Please read her message and relish in it.  Hopefully you can either relate or see a perspective you might not have considered.  Enjoy!

View story at Medium.com

Formation doesn’t include me— and that’s just fine.

Today, in a moment she perfectly choreographed, Beyoncé will perform at the Super Bowl, while her Formation video loops continually on screens around the country. I was working on a commercial shoot in Santa Clara yesterday when news of its release rolled through social media. The Panthers’ team buses had already created a buzz, but it was nothing compared to the party being held on Twitter. As someone who can name more important things Beyoncé has done than songs she’s released, I don’t usually rush to hear her new music, but this time the conversation felt different so I pulled out my small and mildly cracked phone to watch.

The sun was glaring and there was small talk chatter around me, but I knew I was witnessing something historic; weeping when I heard a powerful voice from New Orleans, saw a child dancing before a line of policemen, and a woman in the full glory of who she is, invite her sisters to the party.

By the time I got home, Dr. Zandria Robinson had already composed an astonishing commentary on the video, a must-read to understand why this is more than a song. But I’m here to say something else — if you check the “caucasian” box on a job application, your place is in the bleachers for this dance.

It’s time for us to stop singing along — to Formation, to Kendrick Lamar’s Alright, to any song that has the N-word or celebrates blackness in a way we will never understand. Our ancestors signed away that right when they signed their names to contracts that said they owned human beings or signed tabs in restaurants that didn’t allow “colored people.” If your ancestors were abolitionists or civil rights protestors, maybe you knew these things a long time ago, but for the rest of us, our people were either active racists or passive enablers, a pitiful legacy if ever there was one.

How many centuries were our black brothers and sisters relegated to the position of audience — the thrills of competitive sports, television and movie screens, even the petty dramas of middle class servitude demanding their attention. We gave them the role of witness to our stories without so much as a thought that they might have their own. Today those stories are rising to be told and though we may be the villain or not so much as a paragraph, if we listen, it will be our great joy to learn all that we have missed.

So let’s be where we need to be today and every time Formation plays — on the sidelines cheering.

“SUPER SOAKER” CREATOR RECEIVED ALMOST 73 MILLION IN UNPAID ROYALTIES FROM HASBRO…

Published February 5, 2016 by sheezacoldpiece

  
Did you know Mr. Lonnie Johnson created the “Super soaker” gun? Arguably the best water gun ever made.  It’s a shame it took years for this man to receive his funds off of his invention, yet not a shocker since the corporate hounds are known for lying, cheating, and scheming.  Here’s the story about this below…..
The Atlanta-based company behind the Super Soaker water gun and Nerf toy guns has been awarded nearly $73 million in royalties from toymaker Hasbro Inc., according to the law firm King & Spalding.


Johnson Research and Development Co. and founder Lonnie Johnson have been in a royalty dispute with Hasbro since February, when the company filed a claim against the giant toy company. According to King & Spalding, which along with the A. Leigh Baier P.C. law firm represented Johnson, Hasbro underpaid royalties for the Nerf line toys from 2007 to 2012.

“In the arbitration we got everything we asked for,” said Atlanta attorney Leigh Baier. “The arbitrator ruled totally in Lonnie’s favor.” The attorney also said Johnson “is very pleased” with the outcome.


Johnson could not be reached for comment Wednesday, nor could Pawtucket, RI.-based Hasbro.

The arbitration agreement resolves a 2001 inventors dispute in which Hasbro agreed to pay Johnson royalties for products covered by his Nerf line of toys, specifically the N-Strike and Dart Tag brands, King & Spalding attorney Ben Easterlin said.


In a separate breach of contract suit filed in U.S. District Court in Atlanta in February, Johnson accuses Hasbro of violating a 1996 agreement to pay him Super Soaker royalties of 2 percent for “three-dimensional products” based on the appearance of the toy and 1 percent for “two-dimensional visual representations.”


The suit says Hasbro sold water guns that were “visually similar and based upon the appearance of Super Soaker water guns that incorporate Johnson’s technology.” Johnson also wanted the court to force Hasbro to open its books to determine sales of Super Soaker products from 2006 to 2012.


Johnson, a nuclear engineer, Tuskegee University Ph.D. and former NASA scientist, founded his company in 1989. It was the same year he first licensed the Super Soaker, which generated more than $200 million in retail sales two years later, the company said. The toy was licensed to Larami Corp., which was later purchased by Hasbro.


Johnson holds more than 80 patents, with more than 20 pending, the company said, which said sales of the Super Soaker have approached nearly $1 billion.

As an Alabama high school senior, Johnson finished building a remote-controlled robot with a reel-to-reel tape player for a brain and jukebox solenoids controlling its pneumatic limbs, according to a 2008 profile in the Atlanta Journal Constitution.


After graduating from Tuskegee he joined the Air Force, worked at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory at Sandia, worked for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab on the Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Mars Observer project, among others. He also helped design the Cassini robot probe that flew 740 million miles to Saturn

.

He moved to Atlanta in 1990 before his Super Soaker invention made him wealthy. His inventions have included rechargeable battery technology and thermodynamic energy conversion technology.

Via – http://news.aazah.com/content/super-soaker-creator-receives-729m-unpaid-royalties-hasbro